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been agreed upon in the fiscal cliff talks, not to discuss the details. many look at this bipartisan silence and see an encouraging sign but white house and congressional sources tell me that while the atmosphere around these talks is positive between the president and speaker john boehner, when it gets to the underlying details, progress is maddeningly slow. president obama telephoned senate majority leader harry reid monday while rob nabors huddled for a second day in a row aide to speaker john boehner. no discernible progress toward breaking the fiscal cliff stalemate. mr. obama left that drama behind and told supporters in suburban detroit the fiscal cliff is serious business. >> if congress doesn't act soon, meaning in the next few weeks, starting on january 1st, everybody's going to see their income taxes go up. >> reporter: boehner and house republicans want to preserve all the bush era tax rates due to expire at year's end, shielding everyone from a tax increase. mr. obama wants to raise them for households earning more than $250,000 a year. he has so far resisted gop demands
and house speaker john boehner are talking again with 20 days to go until the fiscal cliff. major garrett is at the white house watching all the negotiations. major, good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning, norah, charlie, and gayle. lots of activity and where there's activity there's hope but not a lot of progress. speaker boehner and president obama talked by tell phone. i'm told the phone call did not go particularly well and they remain divided. they're going to allow business to go on until december 28th. the president remains confident a deal will get done. on monday the president gave republican as new offer, trimming his request for ten years of income tax revenue from $1.6 trillion to $1.4 trillion. he told republicans yesterday he's willing to put tax reform into the mix of negotiations. the republicans said the president is still asking for way too much in tax revenue and they always thought corporate tax reform would be part of the larger way. it's hard to come to a deal when one side officers concessions and the other side says the concessions are
this morning." there are 22 days left to the fiscal cliff deadline. there is no deal yet, but the two leading players are now talking face to face. >> and some republicans m congress are pushing their leaders to be a little bit more flexible. major garrett is at the white house. major, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the white house meeting yesterday between president obama and speaker boehner occurred after the president extended that invitation to boehner quite quietly on friday. after the meeting, both were described as hopeful. even so, a followup meeting between white house staff and republican congressional staff on underlying details of a fiscal cliff deal apparently achieved little progress. the president met with boehner after huddling friday with house minority leader nancy pelosi and telephoning senate majority leader harry reid. both democrats wanted to make sure president obama will not freeze them out of fiscal cliff negotiations. far from frozen, some set of republicans appear to be warming to higher tax rates on households earning more than $250,000
and everyone else who has come through capitol hill and the white house to talk about the fiscal cliff. for the first time since this drama began to play out on a very public stage, yesterday there were no substantive negotiations or conversations whatsoever, none at all. and here is what the public thinks about all this. if, in fact, the nation does go off the fiscal cliff and negative consequences ensue, by a two to one ratio, by the most recent poll, it will blame republican, not the white house. the white house knows this, believes it's in a strong position and intends to use that leverage when and if negotiations begin. for "cbs this morning," major garrett at the white house. >>> federal health officials are watching a medical crisis, an earlier-than-usual flu season. the south is already hit hard, one month earlier. three school systems in tennessee say so many teachers and students are sick, they've closed for the rest of the week. health officials also say this year' flu strain is making patients sicker than normal. the good news, this year's vaccines seem to work well against
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4